Abyei hospital blamed for admitting two patients in a single bed

Pateint in Abyei hosptial,'s female ward

The Abyei Hospital patients blamed the unfolding policy permitting two to three patients to sleep on a single bed.

The hospital admission ward has only eight beds. One bed-stead is allotted to more than two patients during their treatment.

Lack of enough beds in the hospital has caused anxiety because it is against health policy that clearly states that only one person is to receive medication in a bed.

Some patients received their medication on the floor exposing them to a mosquito bite, hence Malaria infection.

Mrs. Aluel, a mother of a one-year-old child, admitted to the hospital expressed her worries when she was asked to share one bed with another patient. “Another woman with her baby and I were put in one bed. It had one mosquito net that we shared.

“This is unfair, to share a bed with someone you don’t know, and both of you are sick! Insufficient space will endanger our lives. We fear contracting other diseases like COVID-19 and skin diseases”. 

Nyankiir Mijok, one of the patients who brought her sick two years old child said her and other caretakers lie down on the floor just without mattresses nor mosquito net.

I have never seen such a situation in my life ever. It is only God to protect us. We always hear of ways people contracted Coronavirus,  by coming closer to one another” Said Mijok.

Now, where is the protection here? I asked doctors here, and they did not answer me. The only person told me that it is a condition that forces them.’’ Nyankiir lamented.

This move was a result of an increasing number of patients according to the hospital officials.

The Director of Abyei Hospital, Mr. Tito Dau, acknowledged the situation citing an unexpected increase in the number of patients seeking treatment at the center. He claimed that more than twenty patients were being admitted with Malaria cases almost daily.

The hospital admitted that there is “no other way to admit the patients than sharing beds.”

“The concern has been shared with health partners to increase the number of beds. It is true, patients shared beds. It is because the number of patients admitted per day is bigger compared to the number of beds in the wards. We admitted more than twenty per day. This number is big. And the majority of them suffered from malaria. I have already informed the administration and health partners about this. And so, the best way is to protect them from a mosquito bite to prevent malaria infection”.

Health doctors empathized that parents should take care of themselves and their children against mosquitoes during these rainy seasons by ridding their surroundings of tall grass where mosquitoes live.

South Sudan experienced shortages of medical facilities and skilled health personnel with a limited supply of medicine. According to the Ministry of Health, South Sudan has about 120 medical doctors and just over 100 registered nurses for an estimated population of nearly nine million people.

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