Economic hardship is a major contributor to family’s break up in Warrap state

Traditonal Court in South Sudan settled community issues. Photo -UNDP

At least 11 divorced cases have been settled by a local bench court in Warrap state.  The traditional chiefs said they were motivated by the soaring economic situation in the country.

Man divorce his wife or woman decide to leave her husband, who could not fulfill her needs. 

Bench Court recorded at least 11 cases of Divorce this month in Kwajok and Turalei towns.

The chiefs said lack of resources put the marriages at risk and lead to separation.  

Paramount Chief Akok Angok is a member of Bench Court in Kuajok. He also blamed the parents for forced marriage could lead to a couple terminating their relationship. 

He calls for an amicable solution to family disputes to avoid family parting. 

“Five women take their certificate document for Divorce this month, and some of them have children. We have seen a misunderstanding in the family due to adultery and lack of money to feed the family. People should sit to resolve that problem and family stay together.”

Another local Chief is Aguek GuaK from Turalei Court. He believes lack of compromise between the couples contributed negatively to the Divorce. Guak is arguing that the two families of the bride and bridegroom suffer most to repay dowries.

He warned the youth not to put their mind on terminating their marriage to get their wealth back. 

“Divorce has risen in the community, you get people to talk about Divorce in all local court, and the reason is that people get married when they are young, and they don’t care about separating.

The chief stressed that people Divorce, and to paying back the cow is a problem. He emphasize that “people should not get married simply without studied themselves”

Currently, there is no one specific statutory law governing marriage and Divorce in South Sudan. 

The Transitional Constitution 2011 recognizes the customary laws and traditions of South Sudanese ethnic groups as governing personal matters.

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