Palakal Residents Going Thirsty as the Main Water Tank Bursts

Water Station in Palakal residential area, Kapoeta

The Palakal area resident in Kapoeta has raised concerns over the shortage of water after their source of water damaged. The community has been fetched water from the tanker installed in the area that busted last week.

Some residents said they find it challenging to get enough clean water for drinking, washing, and bathing.

Others argued that the remaining tanks could not supplies every resident despite water pumped daily.

 “We are urging the government to help them because of the water tank which is busted or spoil no water they always cry every day of water when there is sun water come, but all pour out, so they run shortage of water they are urging the government to help and make the tank,” she said.

“People do quarreling every day because of the water supply. What happens with water? What take water? The tank busted and did pour water out, so children cry for thirst; nothing we can wash the cloth tells the authority to come and help us,” community member stated.

The Palakal asked the town council to address the matter urgently.

Singaita FM spoke to Juma Buhari, Council’s Chief Executive in Kapoeta town Eastern Equatoria, distance his government responsibility to repair the broken water tanker. He said the facility had been handed to the community, and people should contribute money to replace the tank and other maintenance costs.

The water tank of Palakal was hand over to the community management team, mostly the tank that got spoil or burst. Those people did not give any money to the government. It is almost one year they have not given anything to let them collect money to buy another the other tank NGO who did so they have handed to us want the NGO to give the tank the community has to assist.

The government expressed a lack of budget for purchasing a new tank. Some residents said they resorted to drinking from the river as an alternative way to meet their needs but highlighted the fear of water-borne diseases.

 

 

 

 

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